Daring Cities Sessions

Risk Mitigation

Moving Forward: Local and Regional Governments on the Roadmap Toward Our Climate-Friendly, Resilient Future

This session will provide an overview of the upcoming global milestones on the roadmap toward our climate-friendly, resilient future, focusing on the opportunities for local and regional governments to directly engage in and benefit from these processes. High-level representatives of the three Rio conventions will address the criticality of this moment for all levels of government to take bold and decisive action to protect the climate, nature and land, and emphasize the role that cities, towns and regions in particular have in championing ambitious action in these fields. Mami Mizutori, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction and Head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction will then announce the launch of the Making Cities Resilient 2030 Initiative and highlight how cities can benefit from this initiative in further building their own climate resilience capacities.

Disclosing Climate Governance Risk – Ignore This at Your Peril! (Session 2)

In response to climate emergency and other declarations, many cities have developed climate adaptation plans and are acting to build greater resilience to the impacts of climate change. But these plans are very often located in environment or climate change departments of the city structure and are not being applied to reduce climate risk across all city functions. But many managers of other core city functions are not yet aware of the risk climate change will create for the continued safe delivery of core services and governance of the city. This interactive workshop will be an opportunity for managers and policy makers from any local governments, other levels of government and public authorities to explore how to develop a climate policy or corporate standard based on the principles of climate risk disclosure.

Nature-Based Solutions For Cities – What Are They And How Can Their Uptake Be Increased?

Many cities are looking for solutions to protect themselves from the impacts of disasters and climate change. Despite growing scientific evidence on their potential, the adoption of these nature-based solutions is still not widespread. This is particularly the case in cities. The session will explore barriers but also promising ways forward, including best practices from frontrunner cities in different ecosystems, research findings and capacity building activities. The session will also explore how the perception and use of urban green areas changed in the context of COVID-19 and what opportunities this change might present for the acceleration of nature-based solution uptake.

Climate Knowledge Brokering – Voices from the Frontline

Various grassroots organizations across the globe have taken up a proactive role and adopted innovative ways to respond to Covid-19. Many have developed their own localized coping mechanisms, like sharing resources among communities lacking basic services, setting up hotlines for domestic abuse, and diversifying livelihoods. Even with limitations in their mobility and activities, the civil society groups have extended themselves to meet the needs of local communities during the crisis using their critical networks, experience and knowledge in building resilience. As we begin to move towards post-Covid society, our focus should be to ‘build back better’ with collective efforts from all sectors of society including decision-makers, policy-makers, practitioners, community-based and grassroots organizations, and citizens.

Disclosing Climate Governance Risk – Ignore This at Your Peril! (Session 1)

In response to climate emergency and other declarations, many cities have developed climate adaptation plans and are acting to build greater resilience to the impacts of climate change. But these plans are very often located in environment or climate change departments of the city structure and are not being applied to reduce climate risk across all city functions. But many managers of other core city functions are not yet aware of the risk climate change will create for the continued safe delivery of core services and governance of the city. This session will present a cost-effective method for assessing and disclosing the degree to which climate risk has been embedded in all city planning and operations.

Financing Climate Compatible Development

The lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic unveiled the deep vulnerabilities and unpreparedness of the urban system, healthcare and economy to absorb sudden shocks. As the cities begin to unlock and plan for post-pandemic recovery, it’s a wake-up call for our social and financial systems to be better prepared for the long-term climate crisis. There is a need to focus on the climate agenda, even in the midst of the pandemic, so that investments can be routed toward sustainable infrastructure, green jobs, and environmental resilience. Policy makers and decision-makers have an important role to play in orchestrating a recovery that addresses the current crisis, while building a strong foundation to tackle climate change.

Water & Sanitation: What Is a ‘WOP’ and How Does It Help to Tackle Climate Crisis?

Collaboration through Water Operators’ Partnerships (WOPs) are helping water utilities face the COVID-19 crisis and are a cost-effective way to not only share experiences, but to strengthen long-term capacity and improve service delivery. The event will discuss the implications of the climate crisis on water utilities in cities around the world and how, drawing on the experiences from the COVID-19 pandemic and other crises, utilities can strengthen their preparedness and adapt to the climate crisis using a WOPs approach. The event will also provide technical resources and offer opportunities for engaging with the GWOPA network, city and utility leaders and development partners, especially in the upcoming WOPs programme supported by the European Commission.

Resilience Planning and Disaster Risk Reduction for the Unexpected

The COVID-19 crisis has exposed the limited resilience of our cities and has stressed the need to plan better to reduce risks, while focusing on post-disaster recovery and reconstruction. In a way, the crisis has been an opportunity to rethink the way we plan, design, develop and manage our cities, to make sure better prepared to protect everyone when the next emergency arises.